History and Philosophy of Economics

11dec2017 11:00 - 13:00

Evenement

Reading Group organized by Tom Kayzel. The first meeting will be on the 11th of December from 11:00 till 13:00 at the faculty room of the Oude Turfmarkt 141, and we'll be reading The Knowledge We Have Lost in Information: The History of Information in Modern Economics (2017) by Philip Mirowski and Edward Nik-Khah (for more info see below). In case you want to join please send an email t.n.kayzel@uva.nl

History and Philosophy of Economics

Starting from the assumption, shared by the fields of Historical Epistemology and History and Philosophy of Science, that the philosophy of a science should always take into account the history of that specific science, this reading group discusses recent literature on the history of economics in order to formulate philosophical question and answers on the particular nature of this science. We take economic sciences as broadly construed, ranging from the innovations in accounting techniques of the Renaissance to the present neoclassical orthodoxy of academia. Our approach to the subject is diverse, discussing literature from different fields such as History of Economic Thought, Philosophy of Science in Practice and Science and Technology Studies. We welcome all graduate students and researchers with an interest in economics or philosophy of science to our discussion.

Session 1: The Knowledge We Have Lost in Information

In the first session, we will discuss The Knowledge We Have Lost in Information: The History of Information in Modern Economics (2017) by Philip Mirowski and Edward Nik-Khah. For those with an interest in the history of economics, the name of Philip Mirowski is probably already familiar. He became well known through his thesis that modern economics got its shape by mimicking the paradigms of the natural sciences in the late 19th and early 20th century, in More Light Than Heat (1989) and the influence of Cybernetics on post World War-II economics in Machine Dreams (2001). More recently he has studied the development and spread of neoliberal think tanks in The Road from Mont Pèlerin (2009) and Never Let a Serious Crisis Go to Waste (2013). His latest book together with Edward Nik-Khah returns to the history of economics focusing on the concept of information in post-World War-II neoclassical economics.  The book will probably of interest for all who are concerned with a Science Studies-approach to the history of economics or neoclassical economics and neoliberalism in general.

Gepubliceerd door  ASCA