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In this lecture Greg Beckett explores how crisis has come to shape both the spatial form and the social relations of Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

Detail Summary
Datum 14 maart 2018
Tijd 15:00 - 17:00

The city of Port-au-Prince has been formed by decades of crisis, from the environmental crisis that pushed many peasants to the city to the crisis of the city itself, as it developed through the construction of ad-hoc, informal, and precarious neighborhoods. Ostensibly the center of national political and economic life, the city has come to stand, for many residents, as a potent symbol of the absence of the Haitian state. In this presentation, Greg Beckett explores how crisis has come to shape both the spatial form and the social relations of the city. Drawing on over a decade of research in several neighborhoods in Port-au-Prince, he explores how development projects, political upheavals, and humanitarian interventions have produced spaces of insecurity in the city.

Speakers

Greg Beckett is Assistant Professor of Anthropology at Bowdoin College. He has published articles on environmental, urban, and political crises in Haiti and on the ethical and political dimensions of international intervention and emergency response. His book, How Crisis Feels: Living and Dying in Port-au-Prince, will be published by the University of California Press in 2019.

Location

The lecture takes place at the Roeterseilandcampus, building A, room REC A2.07.

Organization

This lecture is part of the Urban Conflict and Security series, organized by Rivke Jaffe (Professor of Cities, Politics and Culture) and Dennis Rodger (Professor of International Development Studies).

Admission

This lecture is free and open to all.

Roeterseilandcampus - building A
Roeterseilandcampus - building A

Nieuwe Achtergracht 166
1018 WV Amsterdam