Education

Students at our faculty learn first-hand about the most recent research developments and experience the expertise, enthusiasm and passion with which lecturers practise their discipline. Challenged to explore major scientific issues, they encourage lecturers to continually improve their teaching.

Students have many different reasons for coming to the Faculty of Science. These include an intrinsic interest in fundamental scientific issues, the desire to work on smart applications of scientific knowledge or the drive to contribute to today's major societal issues such as food, health, sustainability and the environment. It is the Faculty’s ambition to cater to these motivating factors with a varied portfolio of degree programmes, many of which are multidisciplinary or even interdisciplinary.

In all cases, the degree programmes stimulate curiosity and creativity, focusing on analytical and critical thinking as well as the students' personal development. Study associations create a vibrant study environment and organise all kinds of discussion meetings relating to a variety of subjects.

Vision on teaching and learning

The Faculty of Science's vision on teaching and learning strongly focuses on training students to use modern equipment and complex data analysis and to familiarise them with working in interdisciplinary teams. Our campus at Science Park is fully equipped for these purposes, featuring labs for practical training in a variety of disciplines. In addition, there are excellent facilities for self-study and preparation of group assignments.

Science in Amsterdam

By joining forces with Vrije Universiteit Amsterdam for many different joint degree programmes, we can offer students in Amsterdam a greater choice in elective courses, specialisations and thesis projects. In addition, this collaboration enables us to better differentiate the degree programmes and reduce overlap. In this way, every science student in Amsterdam is offered a broad range of options for compiling their own degree programme.

Published by  Faculty of Science

9 October 2015