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People are strongly motivated to be accepted by others. During adolescence there is a peak in the sensitivity to social evaluation by peers. Bregtje Gunther Moor tested how this sensitivity relates to the development of brain regions implicated in social behavior

Event details of Being Left Out: Neurobiological Correlates of Social Rejection and their Developmental Trajectory
Date 20 December 2011
Time 11:00 -11:00
Location Agnietenkapel

People are strongly motivated to be accepted by others. During adolescence there is a peak in the sensitivity to social evaluation by peers. Bregtje Gunther Moor tested how this sensitivity relates to the development of brain regions implicated in social behaviour. She investigated basic biological processes that occur in response to social rejection and how these processes develop with age. To this end she mapped subjects’ brain activity in an MRI scanner and measured their heart rate changes. In a first study she demonstrated that unexpected social rejection leads to transient slowing of heart rate. Next, she repeated the experiment in children of different ages and found that this response only occurs after the onset of puberty and is most pronounced in pubertal girls. In addition, while she observed a strong overlap in brain responses elicited by acceptance and rejection across different ages, there are also differences between age groups. Some regions showed activity that increased with age while others showed a specific peak in activity during adolescence. These age-related differences likely contribute to the heightened sensitivity to social evaluation during adolescence.

Agnietenkapel

Oudezijds Voorburgwal 229 - 231
1012 EZ Amsterdam

Deelname

Ms B. Gunther Moor