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Researchers under the direction of Prof. Dorus Gadella discovered the extremely bright cyan fluorescent protein by using a clever new method to screen bacterial colonies for mutations.

Researchers under the direction of Prof. Dorus Gadella discovered the extremely bright cyan fluorescent protein by using a clever new method to screen bacterial colonies for mutations. This innovative method is based on contrasting fluorescence lifetime measurements with those of conventional screens, which only examine intensity. In view of the blue-green light emitted by the protein, the researchers have dubbed it ‘mTurquoise' (monomeric Turquoise).

The protein has a range of biological applications, especially in cell biology when studying proteins in living organisms and cells. mTurquoise also enables specific applications involving the quantitative study of protein-protein interactions inside living cells.

In addition to mTurquoise, Gadella's research group generated other new cyan-coloured variants which, together with new methods of analysis, will allow the study of several CFP variants of exactly the same colour within a single cell. This ‘lifetime-unmixing' technology, as it is called, will play an important part in current and future systems biology research.

The DNA that codes mTurquoise is available to the scientific community, and can be requested from the researchers.

The department Moleculair Cytology participates in the reseach priority areas Systems Biology of the Faculty of Science. See the link below for more information.

Publication information

Joachim Goedhart, Laura van Weeren, Mark Hink, Norbert Vischer, Kees Jalink & Theodorus Gadella: ‘Bright cyan fluorescent protein variants identified by fluorescence lifetime screening', in Nature Methods 7, 137 - 139 (2010).

Click on the link below to read for the full article.