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Wiemer Salverda, Director of the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS), is coordinating a new international study into socio-economic inequality.

Wiemer Salverda, Director of the Amsterdam Institute for Advanced Labour Studies (AIAS), is coordinating a new international study into socio-economic inequality. AIAS, part of the University of Amsterdam (UvA), is one of the participants in the study into growing disparities in income and education - and their social, political and cultural consequences in the European Union, the United States, Japan, Canada and Australia.

The 80 academics taking part in the ambitious interdisciplinary study Growing INequalities' Impacts (GINI) are all global leaders in their fields. They will be researching 25 EU member states, looking at areas such as access to and achievement in education, unemployment, standards of living, life expectancy, and social cohesion and polarisation. The results will be compared with the situation in developed countries outside the EU: the United States, Japan, Canada and Australia. The researchers will also be making recommendations to policymakers on how to reduce socio-economic inequality.

AMCIS

AIAS is carrying out its research in collaboration with the new Amsterdam Centre for Inequality Studies (AMCIS) at the UvA. Aside from labour economist Wiemer Salverda, other UvA academic staff involved include Herman van de Werfhorst, Professor of Sociology, Wouter van der Brug, Professor of Political Science, Brian Burgoon, Senior Lecturer in Political Science, Caroline Dewilde, Lecturer in Sociology, and Marloes de Graaf-Zijl, AIAS postdoc in Economics. On Friday, 12 February, Karel van der Toorn, President of the Board, signed a contract in which the UvA officially committed the six participating universities to the research.

The first of the project activities will be a conference at the London School of Economics in March, opened by László Andor, the new EU Commissioner for Employment. The EU is investing 2.7m euros in the three-year study. The total budget for the project is 3.5m euros.