For best experience please turn on javascript and use a modern browser!
Bekijk de site in het Nederlands

The research proposal of Professor J. Huisman of the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), part of the Faculty of Science (FNWI), has been approved for a TOP Grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO).

The research proposal of Professor J. Huisman of the Institute for Biodiversity and Ecosystem Dynamics (IBED), part of the Faculty of Science (FNWI), has been approved for a TOP Grant from the Netherlands Organisation for Scientific Research (NWO). These personal grants are awarded to advanced researchers, who have already progressed beyond the Innovational Research Incentives Scheme.

The maximum amount of individual TOP Grants is €720,000. A total of €4.3 million was awarded in the present grant awards session, which considered 46 preliminary proposals and 20 full applications. To date, this has been the only grants awards session, but there are plans to introduce another session in 2011.


TOP grants are intended for established research groups in the earth and life sciences field. The grants provide these groups with the opportunity and freedom to strengthen and/or further extend excellent, challenging and innovative lines of research.

Details of the approved research proposal from the UvA:

Prof. J. Huisman, UvA
Effects of rising CO2 concentrations on resource competition in plankton communities

CO2 concentration in the atmosphere is expected to double this century. The increase would be more extreme if phytoplankton did not absorb a substantial amount of the CO2 for photosynthesis. But what are the consequences of increased CO2 for phytoplankton? Water becomes more acidic through the dilution of CO2 and the proportions of dissolved forms of carbon change. This can have major implications for the plankton species composition, because species differ in their CO2 absorption strategy. This project utilizes computer models, lab experiments and field studies to examine the effects of CO2 increase on plankton in lakes and oceans