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P.D.C. (Pablo) Muruzabal Lamberti

PhD Candidate
Faculty of Humanities
Capaciteitsgroep Critical Cultural Theory

Visiting address
  • Oude Turfmarkt 147
  • Room number: 2.14
Postal address
  • Postbus 94201
    1090 GE Amsterdam
Social media
  • About my research

    My research seeks to address the following questions: (1) What is listening as a spiritual exercise in the classical context of paideia? (2) What does it mean “to do philosophy” today and what can the classical ideals contribute to a contemporary conception of listening as a spiritual exercise? 

    Attempting to understand and interpret ancient ideas related to the subject of listening, and hoping to contribute to the description of the relevant existential ancient attitudes that come with it, I rely on the work of Pierre Hadot. In a combination of historical scholarship and thorough philosophical argumentation, Hadot not only offers a hermeneutical model for reading and interpreting ancient texts, and in a certain sense, writing the history of philosophy; by showing that ancient philosophy is always connected to a living practice, he also offers a model for practicing philosophy itself. Hadot’s model can be used for Hellenistic and Roman philosophy: both share the practical aim and the practice of spiritual exercises. 

    The thread in this study is that ancient philosophy is conceptualized as a pedagogical, and thus living practice with corresponding exercises. In this conception, philosophy in all three of its ancient subdisciplines (ethics, logic, physics) ultimately appeals to the intellect and the transformation of the soul. Based on this conception, I want to demonstrate that listening is a fundamental part of ancient philosophy as a method for educating people to live according to a certain ideal. I do this by offering a historic-philosophical analysis of the classical pedagogical tradition (paideia) and the ancient texts that directly and indirectly correspond to the subject of listening, in order to ultimately sketch my own conceptual framework for defining what listening as a spiritual exercise might look like in contexts where philosophy is practiced today.

  • Publications

    2020

    2019

    2018

    This list of publications is extracted from the UvA-Current Research Information System. Questions? Ask the library or the Pure staff of your faculty / institute. Log in to Pure to edit your publications. Log in to Personal Page Publication Selection tool to manage the visibility of your publications on this list.
  • Ancillary activities
    No known ancillary activities