Voor de beste ervaring schakelt u JavaScript in en gebruikt u een moderne browser!
EN
Master Cultural and Social Anthropology

Meet the people

Cultural and Social Anthropology

Student testimonials

Tine Molendijk
Tine Molendijk. Photo: Marte van Liere.

Tine Molendijk

'Through participant observation, media analysis and interviews, I examined relations between patriotism and (illegitimate) military violence. I cannot think of anything more exciting than seeing your own thesis rolling out of the press, with a picture on the cover of the people you have personally spent time with. My thesis is really my own product, from a to z.'

  • Read more from Tine Molendijk

    My name is Tine Molendijk and I come from The Netherlands. When I graduated from secondary school, I was one of the many young idealists who wanted ‘to change the world’. During my Bachelor’s in Cultural Anthropology this motivation has matured in wanting to contribute my share. Passionate about philosophical abstraction in combination with bottom-up research, and still very much socially engaged, I decided to continue on the same path. I therefore chose the Master’s programme Cultural Anthropology.

    'In this Master we are expected to take initiative'

    I want to stress that many of the connotations people have with Anthropology do not hold any longer, including the idea that the approach of the discipline is necessarily ideologically motivated. Quite the opposite is true. In this Master we were expected to take initiative; we were the ones who chose our subject and spent an entire year studying this, writing the proposal, conducting research and writing the thesis. The specific approach makes it a typical anthropological Master. We were expected to do fieldwork and thus combine an emphatic, practical approach with literature research on a macro level. The three courses in this Master were dedicated to guiding us through our research and helped us taking a stance in current anthropological debates.

    'My thesis is really my own product, from a to z'

    I conducted my research among Dutch combat soldiers; a choice which confirms that anthropology is much broader and more versatile than some may think. Through participant observation, media analysis and interviews, I examined relations between patriotism and (illegitimate) military violence. I cannot think of anything more exciting than seeing your own thesis rolling out of the press, with a picture on the cover of the people you have personally spent time with. My thesis is really my own product, from a to z. However, to complete such a year of independence, you have to be motivated and work really hard. In my year this was the case for all of us. We worked hard and supported each other. The weekly classes were always followed by a few beers, because, in the words of one of our lecturers: ‘people who drink together, think together’.

    'I plan to continue working in the academic world'

    I plan to continue working in the academic world, hopefully as a PhD-student. Some of my classmates had the same ambition, some wanted to end up working for NGO’s, the government, others aimed for something completely different. The only less positive aspect I can think of, is the absence of an internship in this Master. However, in my applications I have already noticed that it is appreciated that I have learned to work independent in this Master, to conduct a complete research and to work on different levels – from the practice of interviewing via a very theoretical level to the level of policy.

    'I would recommend...'

    I would recommend this Master to everyone who is interested in a Master which is still dedicated to actual research, holds high theoretical standards and aims at ‘delivering’ graduates able to take an holistic approach and a critical stance to every social phenomenon thinkable.

FMG Cultural and Social Anthropology Ruby Monde
Ruby Monde

Ruby Monde

The Master’s in Cultural Anthropology at the University of Amsterdam(UvA) provides you with the opportunity to conduct your own fieldwork. For me this was the main reason for choosing this Master’s here. The detailed and intensive preparation courses are really useful to help you design your fieldwork on the topic of your interest. This made sure I was secure and ready when I left the Netherlands for three months, to spend my days with criminalised women in Toronto, Canada.

  • Read more from Ruby Monde

    'I am proud to add to my curriculum vitae  that I've conducted a qualitative research of my own design.'

    Three months of fieldwork at an inspiring, high-spirited, empowering organisation was the experience of a lifetime for me. As a student from the small city of Amsterdam I endorsed in the complex structures of the big city of Toronto. It is still unreal for me to believe that I actually conducted my own fieldwork and wrote a professional thesis about it. This has been a big aspiration for me since I've started the Bachelor’s in Anthropology. Every student designs his research based on a personal topic but gets assigned a supervisor who will guide you to and through this fieldwork. The supervisor will also help and support you while writing the main thesis. However, the Master’s and especially the fieldwork is very independent. Be prepared to be alone in the field and trust on your own instinct and research skills. I am proud to add to my curriculum vitae  that I've conducted a qualitative research of my own design. This is a great skill to add to your cv and also an impressive one for new young professionals like ourselves.

    'The UvA is a dynamic and inspirational place'

    The UvA is a dynamic and inspirational place to do the Master’s in Anthropology. All classes are taught in proficient English. They are filled with inspirational international students to share your experiences with after returning from the intense adventures of anthropological research. We often looked to each other for support and advice and had a good dynamic that added to the quality of the programme and the design of the research and thesis.         

    'A challenging but fulfilling Master’s'

    Before starting this Master’s it is advised to already have a strong idea of what your research will be about. It is recommended to have contacts with the people or organisations you want to conduct your research with or for. Next to designing your own research you will be practicing your practical research skills during the preparation phase of the programme and you have to fulfill the requirements of the theoretical parts of the Master’s. It is a challenging but fulfilling Master’s which deepens your understanding of actual anthropological research and strongly develops your writing and academic skills.

Kiki Collot D'Escury
Kiki Collot d'Escury

Kiki Collot d'Escury

Kiki Collot d'Escury did not want to do research that would only be understandable for a professor or fellow students. After the Bachelor in Cultural Anthropology and Developmental Sociology, she chose for the Master in Cultural Anthropology and Sociology of non-western societies, track Applied Anthropology.

  • Read more from Kiki Collot d'Escury

    It seems like a very long time ago, choosing my studies. I always knew it was going to be something along the lines of Social Sciences. Understanding human interactions, emotions and behaviour from a social and cultural perspective is something I have always had a personal interest in. 

    Why Applied Anthropology?

    During my bachelor in Cultural Anthropology, I found out that I did not want to do research that would only be understandable for my professor and maybe some fellow students; I wanted my research to mean something to other people, people outside the discipline of Anthropology. For me, applied research was the opportunity to show the value of anthropology to the ‘outside’ world, the world we live in. 

    I have focused my research for Applied Ethnography on ‘transgender questions’ within the Dutch sport culture. Particularly focusing on the sports experiences of transgender youth within the Netherlands and the implementation of sport policy that promotes their participation in sports. 

    Access into the field

    At the end of my Bachelor I started to think more seriously about my passion within and outside of my studies and I began to see possibilities in combining those passions. My interest in both sports and applied research lead me to get in touch with NOC*NSF. After a couple of weeks of sending emails back and forth I got in touch with Lieke Vloet, a senior policy advisor at NOC*NSF. She told me that over the past years growing visibility of transgender people within Dutch society, as well as within the field of sports, has led to questions about how to create a sport policy that is ‘open’ towards the participation of transgender athletes. This was the first step into my research field. Instead of starting my research with a theoretically founded question I started with an actual practical social issue: how should sport organizations deal with the increasing participation of transgender people? 

    Research for an organization

    I spent about one day a week in the office at the beginning of my fieldwork. Colleagues would ask me what I was doing and how my research was going, but to be honest, I didn’t really know what I was doing. How do you explain what it means to be doing ‘fieldwork’, when you are in an office and you have never done fieldwork before?

    Working for/with an organization, like NOC*NSF, has taught me a lot. For example, I learned how to communicate to different audiences. I had to use different ways of structuring and representing my research and research questions, depending on the person reading it. In general, my focus often switched from theoretical insights to finding solutions to practical issues. Also, writing reports for the NOC*NSF differs greatly from writing academic literature, the first having to be a lot shorter and more practical. 

    The hockey trainers, Kunti area, India, April/May 2016

    As a graduated Master of Science in Cultural Anthropology, above all, I have learned that anthropology is about creating opportunities. Looking for a job takes creativity, but the sky is the limit and anthropology is literally everywhere.

    Career Steps

    I have worked with a Consultancy Company in legal finance and process; and helped with a project in India, called One Million Hockey Legs, a project focused on creating hockey opportunities for the people and children in different areas of India. Currently, I have a job as an assistant coach in field hockey at the Pacific University of Stockton, California. Some of these opportunities came along partly because of my background in sports, but I noticed that anthropology always seemed to be a very suitable education for the opportunities that I got.

Academic staff

The Programme Director of the MSc in Cultural and Social Anthropology is Dr K. Krause.

mw. dr. K. (Kristine) Krause

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

Drs Marieke Brand is the Study Adviser of the MSc in Cultural and Social Anthropology.

mw. drs. M.E. (Marieke) Brand

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

OBP Groep Onderwijsbureau Sociale Wetenschappen

Lecturers / supervisors

dhr. dr. L.G.H. (Laurens) Bakker

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

dhr. prof. dr. N. (Niko) Besnier

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

mw. dr. Y.M. (Yo) van Ede

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

dhr. dr. R.P.M. (René) Gerrets PhD

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

mw. dr. G.J.E. (Trudie) Gerrits

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

dhr. dr. R.J. (Rob) van Ginkel

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

mw. dr. E. (Erella) Grassiani

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

mw. prof. dr. A.P. (Anita) Hardon

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

mw. dr. C.H. (Tina) Harris

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

mw. dr. H.J. (Anja) Hiddinga

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

mw. dr. A. (Anne) de Jong

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

dhr. dr. B. (Barak) Kalir

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

mw. dr. B.C. (Bregje) de Kok

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

mw. dr. S. (Shanshan) Lan

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

mw. dr. J.A. (Julie) McBrien

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

mw. prof. dr. A.A. (Amade) M'charek

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

mw. prof. dr. A. (Annemarie) Mol

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

mw. prof. dr. A.C.A.E. (Annelies) Moors

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

mw. dr. E.M. (Eileen) Moyer

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

dhr. dr. G. (Gerben) Nooteboom MSc

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

dhr. prof. dr. R.C. (Robert) Pool

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

dhr. prof. dr. M.P.J. (Mattijs) van de Port

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

mw. prof. dr. R. (Ria) Reis

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

dhr. dr. P.T. (Peter) van Rooden

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

dhr. dr. V.A. (Vincent) de Rooij

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

mw. dr. O.K. (Olga) Sooudi

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

mw. dr. R. (Rachel) Spronk

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

mw. dr. L.J. (Luisa) Steur

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Moving Matters: People, Goods, Power and Ideas

dhr. dr. A.T. (Alex) Strating

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

WP Groep: Docenten Antropologie

mw. dr. M. (Milena) Veenis

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

dhr. dr. O.G.A. (Oskar) Verkaaik

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Globalising Culture and the Quest for Belonging

dhr. dr. D.H. (Danny) de Vries

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body

mw. M.J. (Martina) de Witte

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programme group: Forensic Child and Youth Care

mw. dr. E.J.F. (Emily) Yates-Doerr

Faculteit der Maatschappij- en Gedragswetenschappen

Programmagroep: Anthropology of Health, Care and the Body