Fotograaf: Emily Hemelrijk

mw. prof. dr. E.A. (Emily) Hemelrijk

Oude geschiedenis
  • Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen
    Capaciteitsgroep Geschiedenis
  • Bezoekadres
    Oost-Indisch Huis
    Kloveniersburgwal 48  Kamernummer: D 0.06
  • Postadres:
    Kloveniersburgwal  48
    1012 CX  Amsterdam
  • E.A.Hemelrijk@uva.nl
    T: 0205252583

Since 2007, Emily Hemelrijk is professor of Ancient History at the UvA. Her research interests comprise the history of women and gender in Roman society, Roman family history and, more broadly, the social and cultural history of the Roman Principate. Emily Hemelrijk studied Classics at the University of Amsterdam with a Master in Ancient History and one in Classical Archaeology. Her PhD thesis at the Radboud University (Nijmegen): Matrona docta. Educated women in the Roman élite from Cornelia to Julia Domna was published by Routledge (1999 hb; 2004 pb). Before her appointment as a professor of Ancient History at the University of Amsterdam, she worked as a lecurer, assistent-professor and associate professor at the Free University of Amsterdam, and at the Universities of Leiden and Utrecht. She also taught Ancient History, Archaeology and European History at the University of Professional Education in The Hague. Until 2009, she was editor of the Dutch periodical for classical studies Lampas. Currently, she is a member of the editorial board of Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis and of the international scientific committees of Eugesta, Journal on Gender studies in Antiquity and L'Antiquité Classique. In 2015 she has been awarded an honorary doctorate at the University of Göteborg (Sweden).

 

In 2007, she started working on her NWO VIDI research-project Hidden lives - public personae. Women in the urban texture of the Roman Empire. This research project discusses women’s participation in civic life in the cities of Italy and the Latin-speaking provinces of the Roman Empire from the late first century BC to the late third century AD (roughly the Roman Principate). Excluding empresses and other women of the imperial family, it focusses on the civic roles of non-imperial women in Italian and provincial towns on the basis of a corpus of approximately 1,400 inscriptions and, to a lesser extent, honorific portrait statues. Separate chapters of her concluding monograph deal with women’s activities as priestesses, benefactresses, and patronesses or ‘mothers’ of cities and civic associations and with the public honour they received. In comparison to women’s virtual absence from public life in the city of Rome, inscriptions show that, in the local cities, women fulfilled important civic roles for which they were honoured with statues and inscriptions and, more rarely, public funerals. The concluding monograph Hidden lives, public personae. Women and civic life in the Roman West, which is published by Oxford University Press in 2015, discusses the reasons and motives for women’s civic participation, their spread (both regionally and over time) and numbers in comparison to those of their male counterparts. By presenting a fresh and detailed view of women’s civic roles in the towns outside Rome, the book aims to provide a better understanding of women’s integration into their communities and to contribute to a more comprehensive view of civic life under the Roman Empire.

 

Currently, she is working, together with Jane Masséglia (Oxford University) on a sourcebook of inscriptions: Women and Society in the Hellenistic and Roman World. A Sourcebook of Inscriptions, which will be published by Cambridge University Press in 2017.

 

Selected Books:

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2015) Hidden lives – public personae. Women and civic life in the Roman West, New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

 

Hidden Lives – Public Personae. Women and Civic Life in the Roman West discusses women’s participation in civic life in the cities of Italy and the Latin-speaking provinces of the Roman Empire from the late first century BC to the late third century AD (roughly the Roman Principate). Excluding empresses and other women of the imperial family, it focusses on the civic roles of non-imperial women in Italian and provincial towns on the basis of a corpus of approximately 1,400 inscriptions and, to a lesser extent, honorific portrait statues. Separate chapters deal with women’s activities as priestesses, benefactresses, and patronesses or ‘mothers’ of cities and civic associations and with the public honour they received. In comparison to women’s virtual absence from public life in the city of Rome, inscriptions show that, in the local cities, women fulfilled important civic roles for which they were honoured with statues and inscriptions and, more rarely, public funerals. The book discusses the reasons and motives for women’s civic participation, their spread (both regionally and over time) and numbers in comparison to those of their male counterparts. By presenting a fresh and detailed view of women’s civic roles in the towns outside Rome, the book aims to provide a better understanding of women’s integration into their communities and to contribute to a more comprehensive view of civic life under the Roman Empire.

Hemelrijk, E.A. and Woolf, G. (eds) (2013)  Women and the Roman City in the Latin West, Leiden and Boston: Brill (Mnemosyne Supplements, subseries  History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity, vol. 360). The volume was selected for the ‘Choice Magazine Outstanding Academic Title award for 2014.

Roman Cities, as conventionally studied, seem to be dominated by men. Yet as the contributions to this volume – which deals with the Roman cities of Italy and the western provinces in the late Republic and early Empire – show, women occupied a wide range of civic roles. Women had key roles to play in urban economies, and a few were prominent public figures, celebrated for their generosity and for their priestly eminence, and commemorated with public statues and grand inscriptions. Drawing on archaeology and epigraphy, on law and art as well as ancient texts, this multidisciplinary study offers a new and more nuanced view of the gendering of civic life. It asks in how far the experience of women of the local cities in Italy and the provinces resembled that of women in the capital, how they were represented in sculptural art as well as in inscriptions and what kind of power or influence they exercised in the societies of the Latin West.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1999) Matrona docta. Educated women in the Roman élite from Cornelia to Julia Domna, Londen and New York: Routledge (paperback edition 2004).

 

 

 

 

 

Matrona Docta presents a study of the education of upper-class women in Roman society in the central period of Roman history, from the second century BC to AD 235. It studies women's opportunities to acquire an education, the impediments they faced, the level of education they could reach and the judgement on educated women in Roman society. It also examines the role of women as patronesses of literature, learning and Roman women's writing.

 

List of Publications

 

Books and edited volumes:

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2015)  Hidden Lives, Public Personae. Women and Civic Life in the Roman West, New York and Oxford: Oxford University Press.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. and Woolf, G. (eds) (2013)  Women and the Roman City in the Latin West, Leiden and Boston: Brill (Mnemosyne Supplements, subseries  History and Archaeology of Classical Antiquity, vol. 360).

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (ed.) (2009)  Lampas special on ‘Romanisering’,  Lampas 42.3 (together with G. Boter).

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (ed.) (2007)  Lampas special on ‘Antieke herinneringsplaatsen’,  Lampas40.4 (with G. Boter en R. Nauta).

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2005)  Lampas special on ‘Hellenisme’,  Lampas 38.3 (with G. Boter).

 

De Ligt, L., Hemelrijk, E.A. and Singor, H.S. (eds) (2004)  Roman Rule and Civic Life: Local and Regional Perspectives (Proceedings of the fourth workshop of the international network Impact of Empire, Leiden, June 25-28, 2003), Amsterdam: Gieben.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (ed.) (2003)  Lampas special on ‘Griekse lyriek’,  Lampas 36.4.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (ed.) (2001)  Lampas special on ‘de  Laudatio Turiae’,   Lampas 34.1.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1999)  Matrona docta. Educated women in the Roman élite from Cornelia to Julia Domna, Londen and New York, 1999 (hb) and 2004 (pb): Routledge.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (ed.) (1998)  Lampas special on ‘antieke economie',   Lampas 31.4.

 

 

Main articles:

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2016) ‘Women’s daily life in the Roman West’ in Budin, S. and Turfa, J.M. (eds)  Women in Antiquity: Real Women Across the Ancient World, London and New York: Routledge, pp. 895-904.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2015) ‘The Education of Women in Ancient Rome’, in W. M. Bloomer (ed.)  A Companion to Ancient Education, London: Wiley-Blackwell, pp. 292-304.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2014) ‘Women and public space in the Latin West’, in Eck, W. and Funke, P. (eds),  Offentlichkeit – Monument – Text.  Akten des  XIV Congressus Internationalis Epigraphiae Graecae et Latinae, 27. – 31. Augusti MMXII, Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter, pp. 701-703.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2014) ‘Roman citizenship and the integration of women in the local towns of the Latin West’, in de Kleijn, G. and Benoist, S. (eds) (2014)  Integration in Rome and in the Roman World, Proceedings of the Tenth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Lille, June 23-25, 2011), Leiden, Boston: Brill (Impact of Empire vol. 17), pp. 147-160.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2013) ‘Female Munificence in the Cities of the Latin West’, in Hemelrijk and Woolf (2013) 65-84.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2013) ‘Inscribed in the city: how did women enter ‘written space’?’, in Laurence, R. and Sears, G. (eds) (2013)  Written Space in the Latin West: 200 BC to AD 300, London and New York: Continuum, pp. 135-151.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2012) ‘Fictive motherhood and female authority in Roman cities’, EuGeStA, Journal on Gender Studies in Antiquity 2: 201-220.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2012) ‘Public Roles for Women in the Cities of the Latin West’ in James, S.L. and Dillon, S. (eds) (2012)  A Companion to Women in the Ancient World, London: Blackwell, pp. 478-490.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2010) ‘Fictive kinship as a metaphor for women’s civic roles’,  Hermes138.4 (2010) 455 - 469.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2010) ‘Women’s Participation in Civic Life: Patronage and “Motherhood” of Roman Associations’ in Mustakallio, K. and Krötzl, C. (eds) (2010) De Amicitia: Friendship and Social Networks in Antiquity and the Middle Ages, Rome (Acta Instituti Romani Finlandiae; AIRF 36) pp. 49-62.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2009) ‘Women and sacrifice in the Roman Empire’, in Hekster, O., Schmidt-Hofner, S. en Witschel, Ch. (eds) (2009)  Ritual Dynamics and  Religious Change in the Roman Empire. Proceedings of the Eighth Workshop of the International Network Impact of Empire (Heidelberg, July 5-7, 2007), Leiden, Boston: Brill (Impact of Empire vol. 9), pp. 253-267.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2008) ‘Patronesses and “mothers” of Roman  collegia’,  Classical Antiquity 27.1 (2008) 115-162.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2007)  ‘Local empresses: priestesses of the imperial cult in the cities of the Latin West’,  Phoenix 61.3-4: 318-349.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2006)  ‘Priestesses of the imperial cult in the Latin West: benefactions and public honour’,  Antiquité Classique 75: 85-117.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2006) ‘Imperial priestesses: a preliminary survey’ in De Blois, L., Funke, P. en Hahn, J. (eds) (2006)  The impact of imperial Rome on religions, ritual and religious life in the Roman Empire, Leiden and Boston: Brill, pp. 179-193.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2005) ‘Octavian and the introduction of public statues for women in Rome’,  Athenaeum 93.1: 309-317.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2005) ‘Priestesses of the imperial cult in the Latin West: titles and function’,  Antiquité Classique 74: 137-170.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2004) ‘Patronage of cities: the role of women’ in De Ligt, L., Hemelrijk, E.A. and Singor, H.S. (eds) (2004)  Roman Rule and Civic Life: Local and Regional Perspectives (Proceedings of the fourth workshop of the international network Impact of Empire, Leiden, June 25-28, 2003), Amsterdam: Gieben pp. 415-427.

 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2004) ‘City patronesses in the Roman Empire’,  Historia 53.2: 209-245.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2004) ‘Masculinity and femininity in the  Laudatio Turiae’,  Classical Quarterly 54.1: 185-197.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2002) ‘Ambiguity of status: educated women in the Roman élite’, in PRAKTIKA.  Proceedings of the 11th  international congress of the FIEC (Kavalla 24-30 August 1999), Athens, Vol. II pp. 473-486.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2001) ‘Literary patronage and the ambiguous social position of educated women in the Roman élite,’  The Journal of Classical Studies 9: 79-98.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2001) ‘Inleiding: de  Laudatio Turiae’, Lampas 34.1 (2001) 5-17.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (2001) ‘De  Laudatio Turiae. Grafschrift voor een uitzonderlijke vrouw?’ Lampas 34.1: 62-80.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1989-90) ‘A Homeless Billy Goat in Missouri’,  MUSE 23-4 (1989-90) 30-47 (together witht J.M. Hemelrijk).

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1987) ‘Women's demonstrations in republican Rome', in Blok. J. en Mason, P. (eds)  Sexual Asymmetry. Studies in Ancient Society, Amster­dam: Gieben, pp. 217-240.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1987) ‘A Group of provincial East-Greek Vases from South Western Asia Minor’,  BABesch 62 (1987) 33-57. 

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1986) ‘A hunting scene on a Fikellura oinochoe', in H.A.G. Brijder  et al. (eds),  Enthousiasmos, Essays on Greek and Related Pottery presented to J.M. Hemelrijk, Amsterdam 1986 (Allard Pierson Series, vol. 6) pp. 23-28.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1984) ‘Vrouwenprotestdemonstraties in Rome',  Lampas 17.1: 63-80.

 

Hemelrijk, E.A. (1984) ‘"Who knows not what monsters demented Egypt worships?" Opinions on Egyptian animal worship in antiquity as part of the ancient conception of Egypt’, in Temporini, H. and Haase, W. (eds) (1972- )  Auf­stieg und Niedergang der römischen Welt: Geschichte und Kultur Roms im Spiegel der neueren Forschung,  Berlijn en New York, deel 17.4 (1984) pp. 1852-2000 and 2337-2357 (with K.A.D. Smelik).

 

Reviews of:

 

Levick, Barbara M. (2014)  Faustina I and II: Imperial Women of the Golden Age, Oxford: UP (Women in Antiquity) in  Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2014.07.32 (4 pp.).

 

 

‘Gender in de oudheid’; Holmes, B. (2012)  Gender. Antiquity and its Legacy, Londen en New York: I.B. Taurus (Ancients and Moderns) en Foxhall, L. (2013)  Studying Gender in Classical Antiquity, Cambridge: UP (Key Themes in Ancient History) in  Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 127.4 (2014) 703-704.

 

 

Langford, J. (2013)  Maternal Megalomania: Julia Domna and the Imperial Politics of Motherhood. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, in  Classical World 108.1 (2014) 142-143.

 

 

‘De Romeinse stad’; Ray Laurence, Simon Esmonde Cleary and Gareth Sears,  The City in the Roman West c. 250 BC – c. AD 250 (Cambridge UP 2011), in  Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 125.2 (2012) 257-258.

 

 

Dasen, V. and Späth, Th. (eds) (2010)  Children, Memory, and Family Identity in Roman Culture, Oxford: UP, in  Mnemosyne 65.3 (2012) 522-524.

 

 

‘De Romeinse identiteit’ recensie van Louise Revell,  Roman Imperialism and Local Identities, Cambridge UP: 2009,  in  Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 124.1 (2011) 122-123.

 

 

R.R.R. Smith,  Aphrodisias II. Roman Portrait Statuary from Aphrodisias, Mainz: Von Zabern, 2006, in  BABesch 83 (2008) 195-196.

 

 

A. Alexandridis,  Die Frauen des römischen Kaiserhauses. Eine Untersuchung ihrer bildlichen Darstellung von Livia bis Iulia Domna, Mainz : Philipp von Zabern 2004,  Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2006 (BMCR, 2006-08-21)  bmcr-l@brynmawr.edu (7pp.); http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr.

 

 

Hoffmann, G. en Sartre-Fauriat, A. (eds.)  Les Pierres de l’Offrande autour de l’ Oeuvre de Christoph W. Clairmont, Kilchberg / Zürich : Akanthus Verlag für Archäologie, 2 vols., 2001 and 2003, in  BABesch 81 (2006) 233-235 (wih J.M. Hemelrijk).

 

 

P. Stewart,  Statues in Roman Society. Representation and Response. Oxford (Studies in Ancient Culture and Representation), University Press, 2003 in  Mnemosyne 59.4 (2006) 621-624.

 

 

K.M.D. Dunbabin,  The Roman Banquet. Images of Conviviality. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 2003 in  Mnemosyne 59.3 (2006) 473-477.

 

 

Sharon L. James,  Learned girls and male persuasion. Gender and reading in Roman love elegy. Berkeley, Los Angeles, London, University of California Press, 2003 in  Antiquité Classique 74 (2005) 338-339.

 

 

Beth Severy,  Augustus and the Family at the Birth of the Roman Empire, New York and London, Routledge, 2003 in  Antiquité Classique 74 (2005) 537-539.

 

 

“Leven in het Romeinse gezin”; Cokayne, K. (2003)  Experiencing Old Age in Ancient Rome, Londen: Routledge, Dixon, S. (red.) (2001)  Childhood, Class and Kin in the Roman World, Londen: Routledge, Harlow, M. en Laurence, R. (2002)  Growing Up and Growing Old in Ancient Rome. A Life Course Approach, Londen: Routledge, Parkin, T. G., (2002)  Old Age in the Roman World: a cultural and social history, Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP en Rawson, B. (2003)  Children and Childhood in Roman Italy, Oxford UP, in Lampas 37.4 (2004) 326-329.

 

 

 

“Wat is de positie van een ‘first lady’?” recensie van Barrett, Anthony A. (2002)  Livia. First Lady of Imperial Rome, Londen: Yale UP, in  Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis (2003) 416-18.

 

 

Diana E.E. Kleiner en Susan B. Matheson (eds) (2000)  I Claudia II. Women in Roman Art and Society, Austin: University of Texas Press, in  Bryn Mawr Classical Review 2001 (BMCR 2001.11.18)  bmcr-l@brynmawr.edu (5pp.); http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr.

 

 

A.M. Keith, 2000,  Engendering Rome. Women in Latin Epic, Cambridge, University Press (Roman literature and its contexts) in  Antiquité Classique 70 (2001) 138-9.

 

 

B. Patzek, 2000,  Quellen zur Geschichte der Frauen, Bd. I: Antike, Stuttgart, Philipp Reclam in  Antiquité Classique 70 (2001) 256.

 

 

Susan E. Wood 1999,  Imperial Women.  A Study in Public Images, 40 B.C. - A.D. 68,Leiden: Brill (Mnemosyne, Supplementum 194), in  Mnemosyne 54. 2 (2001) 246-250.

 

 

Beryl Rawson and Paul Weaver (eds), 1997,  The Roman Family in Italy: Status, Sentiment, Space, Canberra: Humanities Research Centre en Oxford: Clarendon Press (The OUP/HRC series) in  Antiquité Classique 69 (2000) 336-7.

 

 

Setälä, P. and Savunen, L. (eds.), 1999,  Female networks and the public sphere in Roman society, Rome: Institutum Romanum Finlandiae (Acta Instituti Romani Finlandiae, Vol. 22) in  Bryn Mawr Classical Review (10-3-2000)  bmcr-l@brynmawr.edu (BMCR 00.03.11) 5pp. http://ccat.sas.upenn.edu/bmcr

 

 

Fantham, E.  et alii, 1995,  Women in the Classical World: Image and Text (Oxford: Oxford University Press), Hawley, R. en Levick, B. (eds), 1995,  Women in Antiquity: New Assessments (London: Routledge) en McAuslan, I. en Walcot, P. (eds), 1996,  Women in Antiquity (Oxford: Oxford University Press,  Greece & Rome Studies 3) in  Lampas 31.4 (1998) 351-355.

 

 

Hawley, R. en Levick, B. (eds), 1995,  Women in Antiquity: New Assessments, London en New York, in  Antiquité Classique 67 (1998) 171-2.

 

 

Krause, J.-U., 1995,  Witwen und Waisen im Römischen Reich III: Rechtliche und soziale Stellung von Waisen, Stuttgart (HABES 18) en  idem, 1995,  Witwen und Waisen im Römischen Reich IV: Witwen und Waisen im frühen Christentum, Stuttgart (HABES 19) in  Antiquité Classique 66 (1997) 627-9.

 

 

Watson, P.A., 1995,  Ancient Stepmothers. Myth, Misogyny and Reality, Leiden, New York etc. (Mnemosyne Supplement 143) in  Antiquité Classique 65 (1996) 402.

 

 

Krause, J.-U., 1994,  Witwen und Waisen im römischen Reich I: Verwitwung und Wiederverheiratung, Stuttgart (HABES 16) en  idem, 1994,  Witwen und Waisen im römischen Reich II: Wirtschaftliche und gesellschaftliche Stellung von Witwen, Stuttgart (HABES 17) in  Antiquité Classique 65 (1996) 508-511.

 

 

Vidén, G., 1993,  Women in Roman Literature. Attitudes of Authors under the Early Empire, Göteborg, in  Antiquité Classique 64 (1995) 410-11.

 

 

Duby, G. en Perrot, M. (red.), 1992,  Geschiedenis van de vrouw, deel 1:  Oudheid, in Tijdschrift voor Vrouwenstudies nr. 56, jaargang 14.4 (1993) 478-482.

 

 

‘Een eenzijdige benadering van een belangrijk probleem: B. Witherington en de positie van vrouwen in de vroege christelijke kerk’,  Tijdschrift voor theoretische geschiedenis19.3 (1992) 366-375 (recensie-artikel in samenwerking met L. de Blois).

 

 

Witherington, B., 1988,  Women in the Earliest Churches, Cambridge (Cambridge University Press. Society for New Testament Studies, Monograph Series 59) in Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis 104 (1991) 315-316 en in  Mnemosyne 45.2 (1992) 279-281 (with L. de Blois).

 

 

Waithe, M.E. (ed.), 1987,  A History of Women Philosophers. Vol. I: Ancient  Women Philosophers, 600 B.C. - 500 A.D., Boston/Lancaster, in  Tijdschrift voor Theoretische geschiedenis 17.3 (1990) 329-332.

 

 

 

Popularising:

 

 

- ‘Romeinse weldoensters’, in  Geschiedenis Magazine 49.6 september 2014, pp. 24-27.

 

 

- ‘Spelen met identiteiten. Gebruik en betekenis van Romeinse en inheemse kleding’, in Hupperetz, W., Kaper, O.E., Naerebout, F. en Versluys, M.J. (2014)  Van Rome naar Romeins, Amsterdam Allard Pierson Museum, pp. 136-140.

 

 

- ‘Onzichtbare vrouwen in de Romeinse provincies?’ in  Satricum (nieuwsbrief van Vereniging van Vriende van Satricum en de Stichting Nederlands Studiecentrum voor Latium) 15.2 (2008) 13-19.

 

 

-  ‘Verborgen levens, publieke gezichten: vrouwen in de steden van Italië en de westelijke provincies van het Romeinse rijk’,  Historica 31.3 (oktober 2008) 15-20.

 

 

- Nieuwe  Romeinsen, oratie bij de aanvaarding van het hoogleraarschap Oude Geschiedenis aan de UvA, 29-5-2008, Amsterdam: Vossius Pers (2008); eveneens opgenomen in  Amphora 28.4 (2008) 8-13.

 

 

- ‘Romeins Afrika: een contradictio in terminis?’,  Aanzet 22.3 (2007) 5-7 en 53 (inleiding themanummer over Africa Romana).

 

 

- ‘Kuise  matrona of wulpse Venus? Portretbeelden van vrouwen in het westelijk deel van het Romeinse rijk’,  Tijdschrift voor Mediterrane Archeologie 34 (2005) 14-20.

 

 

- ‘Kind zijn in de Romeinse oudheid’,  Spiegel Historiael 39.5 (2004) 190-196.

 

 

- ‘Een onbekende Romeinse vrouw’,  Gymnasium 21.3 (2002) 8-9.

 

 

- ‘Lofrede voor ‘Turia’,  Groniek 157 (2002) 531-539.

 

 

- ‘De zingende Memnonkolos’,  Hermeneus 73.2 (2001) 166-173.

 

 

-  ‘ Matrona docta: geleerde vrouwen in het antieke Rome',  Spiegel Historiael 35.1 (2000) 15-21.

 

 

- ‘Geleerde vrouwen in de Romeinse elite’,  Kunst en Wetenschap 9.1 (2000) 7-8.

 

 

- ‘Roem, roddel en reputatie: de Romeinse dichteres Sulpicia',  Hermeneus 72. 2 (2000) 76-79.

 

 

-  ‘Geleerde Romeinse vrouwen: een vergeten groep belicht',  Historica 21.4 (1998) 9-10.

 

 

-  ‘Geleerde vrouwen in de Romeinse elite (2de eeuw v. Chr – 235 na Chr.)’ in  NWO Geesteswetenschappen. Jaarverslag (1996)  pp. 93-96.

 

 

- ‘Vrouwen in de Romeinse maatschappij: ideaalbeelden, rolpatronen en roldoorbrekingen’,  Tijdschrift voor Oudheidstudies 2 (1989) 4-16.

 

 

- ‘De Romeinse keuken',  Spiegel Historiael  22. 7/8 (1987) 344-351.

 

 

- ‘Vrouwen in Rome',  Spiegel Historiael  20. 9 (1985) 373-380.

 

 

- ‘Vrouwen in Rome', in  Vrouwen in oude culturen (Studium Generale R.U. Utrecht 1984) 21-35.

 

 

 

2016

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2016). Women’s daily life in the Roman West. In S. L. Budin, & J. M. Turfa (Eds.), Women in Antiquity: Real Women Across the Ancient World. (pp. 895-904). ( Series: Rewriting Antiquity). London and New York: Routledge.

2015

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2015). Hidden Lives: Public Personae: Women and Civic Life in the Roman West. New York: Oxford University Press. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2015). The Education of Women in Ancient Rome. In W. M. Bloomer (Ed.), A Companion to Ancient Education. (pp. 292-304). New York: Wiley-Blackwell. DOI: 10.1002/9781119023913.ch19  [details] 

2014

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2014). Women and public space in the Latin West. In W. Eck, & P. Funke (Eds.), Offentlichkeit - Monument - Text: XIV Congressus Internationalis Epigraphiae Graecae et Latinae, 27. - 31. Augusti MMXII, Akten (pp. 701-702). Berlin/Boston: De Gruyter. [details] 

2013

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2013). Roman citizenship and the integration of women into the local towns of the Latin West. Impact of Empire, Roman Empire, 17, 147-160. DOI: 10.1163/9789004256675_011  [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2013). Female munificence in the cities of the Latin West. Mnemosyne. Supplementum, 360, 65-84. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2013). Inscribed in the city: how did women enter ‘written space’? In G. Sears, P. Keegan, & R. Laurence (Eds.), Written space in the Latin West, 200 BC to AD 300 (pp. 135-151). London and New York: Bloomsbury. [details] 

2012

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2012). Fictive motherhood and female authority in Roman cities. Eugesta, 2, 201-220. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2012). Public roles for women in the cities of the Latin West. In S. L. James, & S. Dillon (Eds.), A companion to women in the ancient world (pp. 478-490). (Blackwell companions to the ancient world). Oxford: Blackwell. DOI: 10.1002/9781444355024.ch35  [details] 

2010

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2010). Women’s participation in civic life: patronage and 'motherhood' of Roman associations. Institutum Romanum Finlandiae. Acta, 36, 49-62. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2010). Fictive kinship as a metaphor for women’s civic roles. Hermes: Zeitschrift für klassische Philologie, 138(4), 455-469. [details] 

2009

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2009). Women and sacrifice in the Roman Empire. Impact of Empire, Roman Empire, 9, 253-267. [details] 

2008

2007

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2007). Local empresses: priestesses of the imperial cult in the cities of the Latin West. Phoenix, 61(3-4), 318-349. [details] 

2006

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2006). Imperial priestesses: a preliminary survey. In De Blois, L., Funke, P. en Hahn, J. (Ed.), The impact of imperial Rome on religions, ritual and religious life in the Roman Empire. (pp. 179-193). Leiden and Boston: Brill.
  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2006). Priestesses of the imperial cult in the Latin West: benefactions and public honour. L'Antiquité Classique, 75 (2006), 85-117.

2008

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2008). Een wereld van verschil? Vrouwen in de locale steden van het Romeinse rijk. Lampas, 41(3), 218-234. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2008). Nieuwe Romeinsen. Amphora, 28(4), 8-13. [details] 

2015

  • Hemelrijk, E. (2015). Romeinse graffiti [Bespreking van: K. Milnor (2014) Graffiti and the Literary Landscape in Roman Pompeii]. Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis, 128(3), 483-484. DOI: 10.5117/TVGESCH2015.2.RECE  [details] 

2014

  • Hemelrijk, E. (2014). Een vrouwelijk gebaar: niet alleen mannen schonken publieke werken in het Romeinse Rijk. Geschiedenis Magazine, 49(6), 24-27. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2014). Gender in de oudheid [Bespreking van: L. Foxhall (2013) Studying Gender in Classical Antiquity; B. Holmes (2012) Gender: Antiquity and its Legacy]. Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis, 127(4), 703-704. DOI: 10.5117/TVGESCH2014.4.HEME  [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2014). Spelen met identiteiten. Gebruik en betekenis van Romeinse en inheemse kleding. In W. Hupperetz, O. E. Kaper, F. Naerebout, & M. J. Versluys (Eds.), Van Rome naar Romeins. (pp. 136-140). (Allard Pierson Museum serie; No. 5). Zwolle: WBooks. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2014). [Review of: B.M. Levick (2014) Faustina I and II: Imperial Women of the Golden Age]. Bryn Mawr Classical Review, 2014(07), 32. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2014). [Review of: J. Langford (2013) Maternal megalomania: Julia Domna and the imperial politics of motherhood]. The Classical World, 108(1), 142-143. DOI: 10.1353/clw.2014.0052  [details] 

2012

  • Hemelrijk, E. (2012). De Romeinse stad [Bespreking van: R. Laurence, et al. (2011) The city in the Roman West, c.250 BC-c.AD 250]. Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis, 125(2), 257-258. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2012). [Review of: V. Dasen, T. Späth (2010) Children, memory, and family identity in Roman culture]. Mnemosyne, 65(3), 522-525. DOI: 10.1163/156852512X621321  [details] 

2011

  • Hemelrijk, E. (2011). De Romeinse identiteit [Bespreking van: L. Revell (2009) Roman imperialism and local identities]. Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis, 124(1), 122-123. [details] 

2008

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2008). [Review of: R.R.R. Smith (2006) Aphrodisias. 2: Roman portrait statuary from Aphrodisias]. BABesch, 83, 195-196. DOI: 10.2143/BAB.83.0.2033107  [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2008). Onzichtbare vrouwen in de Romeinse provincies? Nieuwsbrief Satricum, 15(2), 13-19. [details] 
  • Hemelrijk, E. (2008). Verborgen levens, publieke gezichten: vrouwen in de steden van Italië en de westelijke provincies van het Romeinse rijk. Historica, 31(3), 15-20. [details] 

2007

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2007). 'Romeins Afrika: een contradictio in terminis?'. Aanzet, 22(3), 5-7 & 53. [details] 

2016

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2016). Roman imperialism, gender and anchoring innovation. Paper presented at Expert meeting of Anchoring Innovations (OIKOS) , Utrecht, Netherlands.
  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2016). The Empire of Women.: How did Roman imperial rule affect the lives of women?. Paper presented at Gendering Roman Imperialism, London, United Kingdom.
  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2016). Women’s integration into the cities of the Roman Empire. Paper presented at Science festival, Gothenburg, Sweden.
  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2016). Political graffiti in Pompeii and Rome. Paper presented at Fleeting Testimonies of Urban Life. , Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2008

  • Hemelrijk, E. A. (2008). Nieuwe Romeinsen. (Oratiereeks / Faculteit der Geesteswetenschappen). Amsterdam: Vossius Pers UvA. [details] 

Tijdschriftredactie

  • Hemelrijk, Emily (reviewer) (2016): Tijdschrift voor Geschiedenis (Journal).

Spreker

  • Hemelrijk, Emily (speaker) (7-10-2016): The Empire of Women. Roman imperialism, gender and anchoring innovation., Oikos.
  • Hemelrijk, Emily (speaker) (7-6-2016): The Empire of Women. How did Roman imperial rule affect the lives of women?, conference of the Institute of Classicial Studies (London) , London, United Kingdom.
  • Hemelrijk, Emily (speaker) (13-4-2016): The Empire of Women. Women’s integration into the cities of the Roman Empire, Science festival of the University of Gothenburg (Sweden).
  • Hemelrijk, Emily (speaker) (15-1-2016): Graffiti in Pompeii and Rome, Fleeting Testimonies of Urban Life. Graffiti and other Transient Writings from Antiquity to the Present , Amsterdam, Netherlands.

2017

This list of publications is extracted from the UvA-Current Research Information System. Questions? Ask the library  or the Pure staff  of your faculty / institute. Log in to Pure  to edit your publications.
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