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Research news

Results: 1 - 20 of 67
Results: 1 - 20 of 67
  • 25 Feb 2020
    Addiction expert Reinout Wiers: ‘The mind often wins, but not always’

    Our trainees Maria and Mink, both aged fourteen, talked to brain researcher Reinout Wiers about his discoveries relating to addiction. He learned that automatic processes in the brain play an important role, and that ...

  • 20 Feb 2020
    Problems with cyanobacteria will worsen if CO2 concentrations continue to rise

    Scientists from the University of Amsterdam are warning that problems with toxic cyanobacteria are likely to increase in the future. In an article in the journal Science Advances, they show that a common ...

  • 10 Feb 2020
    Replication study contradicts claim that conservatives have stronger physiological responses to threats than liberals

    For years, a study from 2008 that claimed that conservative people have stronger physiological reactions to threatening stimuli than those who express liberal views, has been widely quoted. A replication study, led ...

  • 23 Jan 2020
    Give willing Member States and European cities a central role in the asylum system

    A central European asylum system supported by all Member States is never going to happen. Organise the reception of asylum seekers among willing Member States, let the other Member States financially contribute and ...

  • 21 Jan 2020
    Study calls for EU trade policy to anticipate ethical and responsible AI regulation

    EU trade policy should carve out space for the regulation of ethical and responsible artificial intelligence (AI) in future trade talks. This is the finding of a new study by researchers from the University of ...

  • 14 Jan 2020
    Computer model describes essential step of embryonic development

    Computational biologists from the University of Amsterdam have succeeded in making a computer model of one of the most essential steps in the embryonic development of Cnidaria. They modeled the process of ...

  • 13 Jan 2020
    Salt creeping
    Creeping of salt better understood

    When salty water evaporates, the salt can crystallize and creep over a long distance. This effect, which can cause serious problems in for example outdoor electronics, was investigated in detail by a team of ...

  • 8 Jan 2020
    Research on multinational enterprises sheds light on gender wage gap

    Amsterdam Business School scholars have studied who benefits financially from working for a multinational enterprise (MNE), and in which situations we see a wage premium.

  • 6 Jan 2020
    Artist’s impression of the area of FRB 180916.J0158+65 (also known as R3) in its host galaxy SDSS J015800.28+654253.0. This image of the host galaxy is derived from the Gemini North telescope on Mauna Kea in Hawaii.
    Repeating Fast Radio Burst adds to mystery about where these signals originate

    Telescopes of the European VLBI Network have observed a Fast Radio Burst originating from a spiral galaxy similar to our own. This Fast Radio Burst (FRB) is the closest that has ever been localised and has been ...

  • 18 Dec 2019
    Large wind turbines lower property value

    The price of houses located within 2 kilometres of a large wind turbine (higher than 150 metres) do not increase at the same rate as average house prices. These findings come from a study conducted by researcher ...

  • 17 Dec 2019
    Credits: Phxere
    How the brain tracks the location of other beings

    A region of the brain known as the hippocampus constantly keeps track of one’s own location in an environment. It uses this information map to create and consolidate personal memories (like the memory of a music ...

  • 16 Dec 2019
    Harpoon mechanism
    University of Amsterdam makes world's fastest molecular shuttle

    Thanks to a clever chemical design, researchers at the University of Amsterdam's Van 't Hoff Institute for Molecular Sciences (HIMS) have succeeded in making a very fast molecular machine. The moving parts shift more ...

  • 16 Dec 2019
    Speed skater Arjen van der Kieft
    The physics of ice skating

    Ice skating is one of the most popular pastimes in the Netherlands. Everyone knows how to do it, yet physicists are only now beginning to understand the underlying processes that make it possible. In a News and Views ...

  • 12 Dec 2019
    Blue whale, taken with a camera drone. This individual is 23 metres long, photographed in May 2018 at Terceira Island, the Azores
    How did baleen whales become our planet’s giants?

    Blue whales are the largest animals ever to have lived on our planet. But why did blue whales and their close relatives, the baleen whales, evolve to be so huge while other animals did not? An international ...

  • 12 Dec 2019
    Best ever pulsar measurements and first surface map produced

    An international team of scientists, including astronomers from the University of Amsterdam, has succeeded in producing the first precise and dependable measurements of both a pulsar’s size and its mass, as well as ...

  • 12 Dec 2019
    Fluorescence intensity image of the contact between a polystyrene sphere and the glass substrate.
    Slippery when wet: how does lubrication work?

    In a recent paper in Sciences Advances, researchers from the University of Amsterdam present new experimental insight into how lubrication works. They have developed a new method using fluorescent molecules to ...

  • 27 Nov 2019
    First gamma-ray burst detection in very-high energy gamma light

    On 21 November two Nature papers appeared on the detection of a gamma-ray bursts in the 100 GeV domain, observed by MAGIC and HESS.

  • 18 Nov 2019
    Machine learning
    ‘Solving problems in big cities using machine learning’

    Maarten Sukel wants to improve the liveability of cities. To achieve this, he is working on machine learning models with various time frames. ‘For the city, I’m trying to solve day-to-day problems happening right ...

  • 18 Nov 2019
    Managers
    Managers do not conform to the standard model of profit maximisation

    People rely on emotions and moral standards, such as the consideration of fairness, in their financial decisions. This makes them less rational than classical economic models tend to assume. One of Professor Sander ...

  • 18 Nov 2019
    Chess
    Men are more competitive than women in the workplace

    New research confirms that men have a more competitive attitude than women. This result may partially explain why men often have higher positions and higher incomes. At the same time, more diversity could be achieved ...