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Research news

Results: 41 - 60 of 83
Results: 41 - 60 of 83
  • 10 Sep 2019
    Human emotional vocalisations: learned or innate?

    Are emotional expressions shaped by innate specialised mechanisms that guide learning, or do they develop exclusively from learning? In a classic ‘nature versus nurture’ study, social psychology researcher Disa ...

  • 4 Sep 2019
    9/11: One event, many meanings

    The 2001 attacks on the Twin Towers prompted an intensification of the debate around Islam in the Netherlands, while in the United States they were seen as a brutal disruption of its national security utopia. Is an ...

  • 2 Sep 2019
    Novel insights into regulation of plant-fungi symbiosis

    Many plants have a symbiotic relationship with fungi to help them mobilize nutrients from their surroundings. Establishment of the relationship is regulated via signalling pathways, of which much was still unknown. ...

  • 1 Aug 2019
    Encoding gravity… without gravity

    Surprisingly, the combination of gravity and quantum mechanics can be encoded in laws of nature that do not involve gravity at all. Physicists from the UvA Institute of Physics and several US universities have now ...

  • 15 Jul 2019
    Plants under drought stress change their microbes through their roots

    Plants that are under stress from drought can change the behavior of nearby fungi and bacteria, according to a new study led by Franciska de Vries, professor of Earth Surface Science at the University of Amsterdam. ...

  • 9 Jul 2019
    Machine learning may help managers to make better decisions

    For his PhD research, Qingchen Wang investigated how machine learning can be used in operation management and digital marketing. Businesses are doing a great job to gather data, but not to use it. Wang takes the next ...

  • 9 Jul 2019
    Monetary policy might be able to limit bubbles in financial markets

    Experiments by behavioural economist Myrna Hennequin suggest that an interest rate hike, combined with a transparent interest rate policy, might dampen expectations that drive bubbles in financial markets. ‘We wanted ...

  • 9 Jul 2019
    Measuring preferences through virtual choice questions

    Sophisticated choice questions and statistical methods are a way to obtain a good insight into people’s preferences. Statistical researcher Roselinde Kessels of the University of Amsterdam uses such methods to study ...

  • 9 Jul 2019
    Drop in air pollution a major boost for solar power in China

    China could significantly increase its production of solar-generated electricity by taking meaningful steps to cut back current air pollution levels. This is one of the main conclusions of a new joint research paper ...

  • 2 Jul 2019
    Daily hormone cycle important for the aging brain

    Aging comes with a risk of cognitive impairment and neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The maintenance of neural stem cells is important to keep the brain functioning. Unfortunately, these cells ...

  • 21 Jun 2019
    The similarities between a Van Gogh painting and a golf ball

    On a molecular scale, there are surprising similarities between the outer shell of a golf ball and the white oil paint used by Van Gogh and his contemporaries. In both cases, the interactions between zinc ions and ...

  • 18 Jun 2019
    Leaving microbes out of climate change conversation has major consequences, experts warn

    An international group of leading microbiologists, including UvA professor Jef Huisman, have issued a warning that climate change will have a major impact on microorganisms with cascading effects on ecosystems, ...

  • 12 Jun 2019
    The dark side of personality

    Social life entails countless situations in which people have to trust each other. From mundane family matters to profane issues such as trade negotiations among world leaders in a conflicted globalized world – all ...

  • 20 May 2019
    Social anxiety linked to both low and advanced emotional intelligence in children

    Why are some children more socially anxious than others? According to one line of thought, socially anxious children are poor at reading the mental states of others, while another line of thought argues that socially ...

  • 9 May 2019
    Why we always spill tea

    Who has never spilled water, tea or wine while pouring it? Pouring liquids is difficult because they tend to cling to the bottle or the teapot spout rather than flowing directly into your cup or glass. A team of ...

  • 25 Apr 2019
    Parents and ‘smart crib’ can soothe baby with sensory stimuli

    What is the most effective way for parents to soothe their crying babies? A combination of sensory stimuli – by way of swaddling, sound and movement – can help, according to a new study by SEIN, the expertise centre ...

  • 24 Apr 2019
    Researchers Nikhef and UvA measure slowest radioactive decay ever

    In the underground Gran Sasso laboratory in Italy, researchers have measured the slowest radioactive decay ever. The result is a spin-off from the XENON experiment’s search for dark matter, which uses several tons of ...

  • 5 Apr 2019
    What do earthquakes and violins have in common?

    A violinist produces music because his or her bow 'stick-slips' along the strings of the violin: there is no continuous sliding movement, but an alternation of standstill and slip. This effect is caused by the fact ...

  • 5 Apr 2019
    ABS research: Does it pay for cities to be green?

    Air pollution is considered to be the greatest human health risk and over 60% of the world population has to deal with water scarcity. City governments are expected to take the lead in tackling these major issues. ...

  • 19 Mar 2019
    'AI can unintentionally result in discrimination'

    'Although a majority of organisations do not set out to discriminate, they may be unaware, however, that the systems they rely on can have discriminatory effects', writes Professor Frederik Zuiderveen Borgesius in ...