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Public International Law (International and European Law)
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‘I became deeply interested in state responsibility and human rights law’

Joëlle Trampert is a PhD candidate at the University of Amsterdam. She finished the Master's program in International and European Law: ‘The Amsterdam Law School offers an ideal Master’s in this field, as students can tailor the programme to meet their individual interests and needs.’

Joëlle Trampert, graduate PIL

‘I joined the UvA’s Faculty of Law as a PhD candidate in September 2018. My thesis explores the outer limits of state liability for assisting serious human rights violations under public international law. 

I became deeply interested in state responsibility and human rights law during my Master’s program in International and European Law at the UvA. Amsterdam Law School offers an ideal Master’s in this field, as students can tailor the programme to meet their individual interests and needs. In addition, many professors have a background in legal practice, and most of them run cutting-edge research projects that students can get involved with. I knew some of the professors from my time here as a student, and the informal and engaging culture of the faculty is as strong as ever. These factors motivated me to apply for a position as a doctoral researcher here, besides of course my enthusiasm for the research project I am part of and the opportunity to work with my current supervisors. 

After graduating, I completed internships at the Extraordinary Chambers in the Courts of Cambodia and a law firm specialized in human rights in Amsterdam. Prior to my PhD, I worked at the Court of Justice of the European Union in Luxembourg. Another example of a potential working environment as a graduate with an LLM in International and European Law. I can confidently say my Master’s equipped me with the knowledge and skills that helped me embark on a career in legal practice and academia.’