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Master
Sociology
Vergelijk
  • First semester

    In the first block of the first semester, we will offer the following courses (their names are identical to the names of the 4 trajectories). Students will choose 2 out of these 4 courses of 6 ECTS each:

    • Key debates in Gender and Sexuality 
    • Migration, Race and Ethnicity
    • Social Problems and Public Policy
    • Economy, Work and Culture

    In the second and third block students will follow 2 out of 5 courses of 9 ECTS each:

    • Body, Emotions and Culture
    • Vulnerability and Inequality
    • Welfare States and Markets
    • Sustainable Cities
    • Queer Interruptions: Theoretical subversions with Feminists, Lovers, Animals, Cyborgs & Drag
  • Second semester

    In the second semester students will work with a supervisor and a small group of students on their own research project. Methodology training will also happen in this small-scale intensive setting to allow for a hands-on approach that is tailored to the project.

COURSES SEM 1 SEM 2 SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 EC
  • Key debates in Gender and Sexuality
    Period 1
    6

    This advanced course in gender and sexuality studies explores interdisciplinary perspectives on key debates. Over six weeks, topics include anti-gender mobilisations, social reproduction, gender-based violence, sexuality, bodies and pleasure, and representation and power. Students gain a solid understanding of gender theory, sexuality studies, and critical perspectives on contemporary socio-cultural debates, with an emphasis on intersectionality and decolonial approaches. The course serves as the core for an interdisciplinary master's track, allowing further specialisation through electives and the master's thesis.

  • Migration, Race and Ethnicity
    Period 1
    6

    This course provides students with theoretical and analytical tools to critically examine modern migration debates in the context of race and ethnicity. Objectives encompass understanding sociological perspectives on migration, analyzing global migration trends in historical and local contexts, and honing skills in evidence-based argumentation and critical thinking. Adopting an interdisciplinary approach, the course explores topics such as the refugee crisis, racialisation of migrants, and ethnic discrimination, drawing from sociology, anthropology, political science, and gender studies.

  • Social Problems and Public Policy
    Period 1
    6

    This course empowers students to interpret and apply sociological perspectives on social problems and public policy. Focusing on Work, Care, and Debt, students analyze how authorities address these issues, emphasizing understanding over evaluation. Exploring the influence of 'neoliberalism,' the course concludes by encouraging students to envision future possibilities, blending academic insight with social engagement.

  • Economy, Work and Culture
    Period 1
    6

    This course explores the cultural dimensions of the economy, fostering critical reflection on topics like value and work. Through sociological tools, students delve into the cultural dynamics shaping markets and organizations. The course addresses contemporary economic issues, emphasizing the societal implications of economic structures in the context of rising inequalities and resource commodification.

  • Body, Emotions and Culture
    Period 2
    Period 3
    9

    This course explores the sociology of the body and emotions, examining theoretical approaches and research methods like interviews and media analysis. Students will critically assess the broader implications for sociology, integrating empirical research with subfields like gender, inequality, health, and politics. Emphasizing written assignments and group projects, the course explores how the body and emotions intersect with societal themes.

  • Vulnerability and Inequality
    Period 2
    Period 3
    9

    This course equips students with social scientific theories to comprehend vulnerability and inequality, challenging assumptions about who qualifies as vulnerable. It explores perspectives like deviance, stigma, intersectionality, and risk, delving into the social dynamics and coping mechanisms of vulnerable groups. The applied component addresses research methods, policy implications, and the complexity of analyzing factors like age, gender, race, and socio-economic status. Drawing from the sociology of health and illness, the course provides a multidimensional toolkit for examining cultural meanings, political-economic factors, and critical perspectives on vulnerability.

  • Welfare States and Markets
    Period 2
    Period 3
    9

    This course delves into recent debates on welfare states and markets, examining their impact on social inequality. Students critically engage with literature, applying social scientific concepts to analyse policies and societal structures. The focus includes exploring different models of democratic capitalist societies and assessing how welfare policies have evolved under various pressures, from internal changes to globalisation.

  • Sustainable Cities
    Period 2
    Period 3
    9

    "Sustainable Cities" integrates social and ecological sustainability, emphasising sociology's role in formulating just and inclusive urban sustainability programs. The course combines sociological theory with hands-on research and policy development, involving students with NGOs, municipal workers, and community organizations on topics like energy transition and housing. Objectives include providing students with a theoretical vocabulary for socio-ecological sustainability, fostering critical thinking on its social, political, and practical aspects, and examining the intersectionality of class, gender, race, and ecological practices in cities.

  • Queer Interruptions: Theoretical subversions with Feminists, Lovers, Animals, Cyborgs & Drag
    Period 2
    Period 3
    9

    This Queer Studies course explores recent debates and cultivates theoretical understanding. It delves into the historical construction of racial, ethnic, class, and gender taxonomies, fostering analytical skills and challenging normative discourses for potential change and subversion.

  • Master Thesis Seminar
    Period 4
    12

    The second semester begins with a thesis proposal seminar, involving 8-10 students who work closely with their first supervisors to develop individual focuses and research questions. The thesis proposal, a crucial foundation for the thesis, requires thoughtful and iterative consideration of all research aspects, fostering thoroughness and attentiveness. The main goal is for each student to produce a 5 to 10-page research proposal while also developing critical reflection skills through constructive feedback on peers' work.

  • Master's Thesis Sociology
    Period 4
    Period 5
    Period 6
    18

    The Master's thesis is the final assessment of your ability to conduct Master's level sociological research. It involves identifying a relevant problem, formulating a coherent research question, and independently conducting empirical research. The goal is to demonstrate creative application of theoretical insights, generate new knowledge, and report results systematically, making the thesis the most important and challenging part of the MSc Sociology programme.

Compulsory course
Elective
Find more information in the online course catalogue
Additional information
  • Internship

    To gain professional experience in the field of Sociology, you can replace one of the electives with an internship.

  • Workload

    A large part of your programme focuses on self-study. You will have around eight contact hours a week. The remaining time will be devoted to reading literature, doing research and writing papers and essays.