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Bachelor
English Language and Culture
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Study programme

In the Bachelor's English Language and Culture, you study the rich and vibrant cultural, literary and linguistic heritage of the English-speaking world. You are introduced to fields of study such as World Englishes and World Literature in English.

Programme structure

In this programme you develop a broad foundation in the field of English studies through language, literature and linguistics. You cover the traditional canon of English literature and examine the newest forms of contemporary English literature from around the globe. You also explore the history and structure of the English language, and its variation around the world. The programme offers you the opportunity to specialise in either ‘World Literatures in English’ or ‘English Linguistics and Literature’ during your second and third years. Alongside the core programme, you can select a minor in one of your fields of interest. You can also decide to study abroad for a semester or do an internship.

The first year

The first year of the programme provides you with a broad, general overview of the entire field of English studies. The literature courses serve as an introduction to the history, literature and cultural theories of the English language. The linguistics courses introduce you to World Englishes; the origins, development and spread of English, and ways of analysing language in use. As part of your core literature and linguistics courses you will take classes on Academic Skills, where you will learn and refine the tools and approaches needed for academic research and writing. You will work on improving your argumentation, presentation and research skills using a variety of multimedia tools.

The second and third years

During the second and third years, the programme offers students the opportunity to specialise in either ‘World Literatures in English’ or ‘English Linguistics and Literature’ through a choice of new and innovative courses, such as ‘Contemporary World Literature’ and ‘Language in Society’.
In the linguistics courses, you examine the complex relationship between language and society, both in the present-day as well as over time. The courses in literature explore contemporary literary and cultural theory. In addition to the core courses, you will be able to tailor the programme to your specific interests by choosing from a range of elective courses. 
In the third year, you will have the opportunity to spend a semester or year studying abroad, and/or completing an internship.

Curriculum

Please note: This is the study schedule of the shared programme of the Bachelor's English Language and Culture. View the UvA Course Catalogue for the programmes of the specialisations.

COURSES SEM 1 SEM 2 SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 EC
  • English Linguistics 1: Stories of English
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 1
    6
  • English Literature 1: Genres, Texts and Contexts
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 1
    6
  • English Linguistics 2: English and Englishes
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 2
    6
  • Literary Theory
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 2
    6
  • Texts in Focus 1
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 3
    6
  • English Literature 2: Early Modern Literature
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 4
    6
  • Rhetoric and Writing
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 4
    6
  • English Linguistics 3: Language in Use
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 5
    6
  • English Literature 3: The Long Nineteenth Century
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 5
    6
  • English Linguistics 4: Research in English Linguistics
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 6
    6
COURSES SEM 1 SEM 2 SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 EC
  • English Literature 4: Literary Theory
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 1
    6
  • English Literature 5: Modern and Contemporary Literature
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 5
    6
  • Texts in Focus 2
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 6
    6
  • Restricted-choice electives: core courses
    2—4
    18
  • Restricted-choice electives: programme-related courses
    1—5
    12
  • Free-choice electives
    1—5
    12
COURSES SEM 1 SEM 2 SEMESTER 1 SEMESTER 2 EC
  • Philosophy of the Humanities (LCA and English)
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 1
    6
  • Debates in English Studies
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 2
    6
  • English Research Seminar
    ???studyprogramme .period??? 4
    6
  • Free-choice electives
    1—5
    30
  • Bachelor's Thesis English Language and Culture
    1—6
    12
UvA Course Catalogue: English Language and Culture
  • Minor and electives

    Next to your regular courses and your specialisation, you will also have 30 ECTS worth of space to fill by doing electives, a minor, an internship or by studying abroad.

    Electives

    In theory, any course can be taken as an elective, from courses offered by the Faculty of Humanities to those offered by other faculties or even other universities. Most programmes offer separate electives.

    Minor

    A minor is a cohesive teaching programme that consists of 30 ECTS. Doing a minor is not mandatory. However, it may be a good way to prepare for a Master’s programme or for a certain profession.

  • Internship and studying abroad

    The programme allows for you to do an internship and/or to study abroad for a period of time.

    Internship

    You can enrich your study programme as well as your CV by doing an internship. This will allow you to gain experience at an organisation in the field of Ancient Studies and gives you an impression of the job opportunities they offer.

    Studying abroad

    The UvA is closely involved with international programmes involved with cooperation and exchange within Europe, the United States and Canada. This gives you the opportunity to study abroad for a period of time.

  • Learning and assessment

    English Language and Culture is a three-year Bachelor’s degree that consists of 180 ECTS (European Credit Transfer System) credits. Each academic year accounts for 60 ECTS spread across two semesters, with each semester comprising two 8-week blocks and one 4-week block of classes.

    As a Bachelor’s student, you are expected to spend an average of 42 hours a week on your studies.

    • In your first year, 12 to 15 of those hours will be spent attending lectures, while in your second and third years you will have approximately 8 to 10 hours of class. 
    • The remaining time will be spent on self-study, preparing for lectures and seminars, completing coursework and assignments, as well as exams.
    • You will attend both lectures and small group seminars.
    • Lectures generally introduce the main topics of the course, discussing and explaining course readings and literature.
    • In the seminars, you will work closely with your fellow students, collaborating on assignments, presentations and talks.
    • You will be tested by means of written and oral exams, presentations, essays, reports and assignments.
    • Your final grade for a course is determined by the results you receive for each of these.
  • Honours programme

    Highly-motivated students may qualify to take part in a selective honours programme. This programme accounts for an additional 30 ECTS and will help familiarise you with various other aspects of academic research and prepare you for a subsequent Research Master's degree.

  • Studying part-time

    It is possible to enroll in this programme as a part-time student.

    • Part-time students follow the same programme as full-time students. However, you follow less courses per year and the course load of the programme will be 30 credits per year instead of the full-time course load of 60 credits per year. Part-time students complete the programme within six years.
    • As for full-time students there is a Binding Study Advice (BSA): in the first year it is required to obtain a minimum of 24 credits in order to re-enroll for the second year.
    • The tuition fee for part-time students is lower than the fee for full-time students, for more information see tuition fees.
    • Part-time students are not entitled to the Dutch student loan system.